NO CLASH! Miter Saw Installed To Table Saw Outfeed Table | All-In-One Workbench PART 3

Making the most of a small shop – Part 3

In PART 1 and PART 2 of this, The Ultimate All-In-One Woodworking Bench build, I assembled the frame and with some clever techniques, installed my table saw to sit perfectly flush with the top. However, simply installing a table saw to a woodworking workstation does not make it the “ultimate”. That’s why I jumped right back in and added my second tool to the bench.

 

With PART 2 complete, the table saw was installed.

 

After my table saw, my miter saw is one of the most crucial pieces of hardware in my shop and therefore it was to be the next tool to be added to my All-In-One woodworking station.

No Clash! Miter and table saw on one workstation

With my Makita MLT 100 table saw installed I was able to use the entire 2.4m(7.8ft)X1.6m(5.3ft) bench top as an outfeed table. This greatly increased the usability of this nifty little table saw.
The trick now would be to install the miter saw in a way that would still allow me to use the entire bench to support overhang when sizing panels with the table saw.
I also wanted to recess the miter saw so that the bed on the saw would sit flush with the top of the bench.

To do this I decided to install a recessed bed with a pivot at the back for my Metabo KGS 254 M miter saw that would allow me to fold it away underneath the bench when it restricts the cutting of large panels with the table saw.

 

Note: Because not all miter saws have the same dimension this design may need to be adapted to accommodate a different saw.

PART 3: Table saw miter saw combo workbench

The instructions that follow are intended to be considered along with the visual instruction provided by the video above.

Planned layout when completed.

Step 1: Top Cutout

My first step in adding my miter saw to the workstation was to remove the segment of the bench top where the miter saw would be installed.

To make this cut-out, a guide plank was installed on the underside of the bench top at a depth that would adequately accommodate the miter saw. In this case, 700mm(27.559″).
To determine this distance I considered the length of the saw (back to front) with the slide in its forward position.

I used this plank along with the two partitioning panels that form the sides of the miter cavity to guide my cut.
By cutting slightly toward the inside of the guide plank and these panels, I removed the largest part of the cut-out using a jigsaw. The remaining edge was trimmed using a router and a flush trim bit.

The two partitioning panels that form the sides of the box was installed at a width that would accommodate the miter saw bed at a 45° angle in both directions (PART 1).


Step 2: Miter saw base preparation

With the cavity prepared, I assembled the base to which the miter saw would be fixed.

The base was assembled with stiffener planks on the underside to prevent deflection.
The pipe holders that would form the pivot point was attached to these stiffener planks toward the back of the base.

For the hinge action, I used a 19mm(3/4″) stainless steel pipe which meant that the pipe holders needed a 19mm(3/4″) hole drilled in the center to accommodate the pipe.

Further preparation on the saw base was done by cutting holes on the two front corners to accommodate the latches that will be used to lock the saw base in its working position.


Step 3: Fitting the base to the bench

To add the prepared miter saw base to the bench, holes needed to be added to the cavity side panels that would allow me to extend the pipe through on both sides.

These holes were made to be oversized, allowing the pipe to sit loosely inside them. I could then install bushes on the outside of the side panels in a way that would allow me to slightly adjust the height of the base.

Step 4: Bush and bush housing preparation

The bush housing was cut from a piece of pine plywood.

A hole was drilled in the center of the bush housing into which the bush would be inserted.
Further preparation of the bush housing was done by adding four slots to be used to fix the housing to the side panels that form the cavity.
The slots were made by drilling two holes per slot and removing the piece between them with a jigsaw.
Adding slots to the bush housing is what would give me the ability to fine-tune the height of the saw.

The bush was made from nylon as it would be more resistant to wear when the stainless steel pipe rotates inside it.
In addition to the this, a flange with four holes was added to the bush so it could be fixed to the housing with screws.

Step 5: Fixing the bush housing and latches

With the bush housings prepared, installing them was as simple as sliding them over the pipe and attaching them with bolts from the inside of the miter saw cavity.

The bolts were sunken to prevent them from clashing with the saw base when it is being folded up/down.

After the bush housings were fixed, a clamp was added to the piece of pipe protruding from each bush to prevent the pipe from moving out of the bush.

At this stage, the base was clamped in its working position and the miter saw attached to it. This allowed me to make fine adjustments to the bush housing to line up the bed of the miter saw with the bench top.

Thereafter, toward the front of the cavity, in line with the holes cut in the base for the latches, stop blocks were installed on both sides.
The toggle latches were installed on top of the stop blocks allowing them to latch the base in place through the holes.

Finished!

Part 3 of my All-In-One bench build was concluded with the bush housing secured and the front toggle latches installed.

Now I would be able to disengage the toggle latches and swing the whole saw down and out of the way of the table saw when needed.

Clips were added to the latches to prevent them from popping open while the saw is being used.

I am still planning on adding additional failsafe mechanisms to prevent the saw from dropping in the case of a latch failure. This will be explained as the bench build continues.

 

Posted by Jean

Website: http://woodworkjunkie.com

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